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Like Oceans of Liquid Skin by ES Wynn

Like Oceans of Liquid Skin by ES Wynn is a horror/scifi choose-you-own-adventure book, about a mutagenic weapons expert, stuck in a planet with an army of John Carpenter’s The Thing’s older, meaner, hungrier brothers.

All but mindless…

Doctor Taldas is a mutagenic weaponry expert in the employ of the Grey Society, a secret conglomerate of scientists and weapons manufacturers that have their hands in almost every pie in the stairways. After being called to Orcus Delta to investigate a case of what is described as a ‘possible xenological epidemic’ he realizes that Hell is a very real place, somewhere in the western spiral arm of the Galaxy.

http://www.deviantart.com/#/art/Space-Thing-332988824?hf=1

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Remembering Iain M. Banks, a Science Fiction legend

Remembering Iain M. Banks

 

On June 9th, 2013, one of the greatest modern writers of science fiction was lost to us after a long, harrowing struggle with cancer. For those of you not in the know, Iain Banks was, in may ways, the father of the modern cinematic science fiction: he was a weaver of worlds, of powerful imagery, of wide-screen infinite-budget CGI borne from a very rich imagination.

Born February 15th, 1954 to a professional ice-skater mother and an Admiralty Officer father, Banks decided that the one thing he always ever wanted to do was to just…write. From the age of 11, he began the long process of weaving worlds, which produced an entire novel (the Hungarian Lift-Jet) by the age of 16. After finishing his very first honest-to-God novel, the Wasp Factory, in 1984, Iain had apparently worn a considerable number of typewriters down, which led his agent to agree with him in a one-book-per-year deal. Iain (reluctantly) agreed.

His work has been adapted into television series, radio-dramas and a theater play, called The Curse of Iain Banks. A politically active and terrifyingly imaginative man, Iain Banks did his absolute best to be a man of the world and a writer first, instead of simply resting in his polymer-based orbital palace he’d built for himself thanks to his work.

 

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