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Speech Sounds by Octavia E. Butler

“Speech Sounds” is a 1983 science fiction short story by Octavia E. Butler, and was the winner of a 1984 Hugo Award. It is about a plague that wipes out humankind’s ability to speak, and one woman’s adventure as she tries to get from Los Angeles to Pasadena without being killed. Read More

After the Myths Went Home by Robert Silverberg

After the Myths Went Home by Robert Silverberg is the one story you know it would make for an awesome Dr Who special. Or Twilight Zone episode. Or anything, just somebody PLEASE MAKE THIS!

“Leor’s new machine had crystal rods and silver sides. A giant emerald was embedded in its twelve-angled lid.”

There are no problems in the future. Everyone’s belly is full, no-one drowns or thirsts or is ever unhappy. There are such lovely marvels in the future, when the mysteries of the Universe have been laid bare and Earth’s problems are in Earth’s past, the planet itself a distant memory.

It is the best of times and the worst part is, everybody agrees.

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Remembering Iain M. Banks, a Science Fiction legend

Remembering Iain M. Banks

 

On June 9th, 2013, one of the greatest modern writers of science fiction was lost to us after a long, harrowing struggle with cancer. For those of you not in the know, Iain Banks was, in may ways, the father of the modern cinematic science fiction: he was a weaver of worlds, of powerful imagery, of wide-screen infinite-budget CGI borne from a very rich imagination.

Born February 15th, 1954 to a professional ice-skater mother and an Admiralty Officer father, Banks decided that the one thing he always ever wanted to do was to just…write. From the age of 11, he began the long process of weaving worlds, which produced an entire novel (the Hungarian Lift-Jet) by the age of 16. After finishing his very first honest-to-God novel, the Wasp Factory, in 1984, Iain had apparently worn a considerable number of typewriters down, which led his agent to agree with him in a one-book-per-year deal. Iain (reluctantly) agreed.

His work has been adapted into television series, radio-dramas and a theater play, called The Curse of Iain Banks. A politically active and terrifyingly imaginative man, Iain Banks did his absolute best to be a man of the world and a writer first, instead of simply resting in his polymer-based orbital palace he’d built for himself thanks to his work.

 

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Life on the Moon by Tony Daniel

This is a guest post by Jillian Terry.

First published in Asimov’s, this short story received the magazine’s Readers Choice award for 1996. The futuristic story was also nominated for the Hugo Award for Best Story in the same year. The story is told from the perspective of a writer whose wife travels to the moon. Read More