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Roses by Moonlight in Book of Enchantments by Patricia C. Wrede

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This is a guest post by Ken Myers.

Book of Enchantments is a short story anthology that collects several science fiction and fantasy stories by the same author. However one story in particular I thought was very well written. It is the story called “Roses by Moonlight”.

The story is set in modern times with an older teenage girl smoking in front of her house to avoid her slightly younger, and more popular, sister’s party. Adrian, the one smoking, is surprised when her quiet and controlled mother comes out of the house and tells her to expect a visitor. Mysteriously, the mother tells her to wait outside for a woman who will offer her something, something she must be very wise in taking. Curious and not wanting to join the party, Adrian waits.

A dark haired woman eventually approaches and asks Adrian to follow her to the rose garden. Since there is no rose garden nearby Adrian is puzzled but follows. Through a large hedge they emerge into a huge rose garden with every color and variety of roses ever grown. The woman tells Adrian to pick one rose, only one.

Adrian bends over to smell a nearby rose and is assaulted by a flash of the future. Startled, she smells more roses. Each one has a different version of the future. However in each one Adrian and her sister are at odds. Eventually Adrian reaches the last rose, just a bud, and smells it. I won’t give away the end.

I found this story to be thought provoking and insightful into the way we change our lives based on minor decisions. It is implied that Adrian’s mother chose poorly and does not want her daughter to do the same. What would you do if you could choose your future?

Author Bio:

Ken Myers is the founder of http://www.longhornleads.com/ & has learned over the years the importance of focusing on what the customer is looking for and literally serving it to them. He doesn’t try to create a need, instead he tries to satisfy the existing demand for information on products and services.